PAINTINGS FOR A NEW MUSEUM IN NEW YORK
I have recently completed six paintings for the National Park Service for permanent installation in a new museum in New York City. The museum, which opened in 2010, commemorates an eighteenth century Black burial ground which was discovered a few years ago during the construction of a federal office building in lower Manhattan. The burial ground dates from the 1740s when it was just outside the wall of the city.

My paintings will help explain the history of the burial ground specifically and of 1740s New York in general. The paintings are all enlarged 400% and are installed permanently on the walls. Four of them are placed in a 360 degree circle and depict mourners and gravediggers standing near a grave. The rest of Manhattan appears around them as mostly countryside. To the North I show Broadway as it was then: a meandering dirt road. To the South appears the palisade or wall of palings which enclosed the city. To the East are light industry and ponds. To the West behind the gravediggers is a gate to New York.

I painted two other scenes which are also installed to depict the context of the burial ground. One shows a nearby orchard which illustrates that New York was not very urban at the time. The other scene depicts an act of arson in New York in 1741 which figures in a narrative presented by the museum. All of the paintings required careful research and contain lots of detail which had to be verified by the National Park Service. Please see LindgrenSmith.com for more information on this project.

MANHATTAN BURIAL GROUND/WEST      WATERCOLOR

MANHATTAN BURIAL GROUND/NORTH

MANHATTAN BURIAL GROUND/EAST

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